10 thoughts on “When You Rub Two Climatologists Together

  1. Darkstar

    For your reading pleasure:

    WSJ “No Need to Panic…”
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204301404577171531838421366.html?KEYWORDS=no+need+to+panic+about+global+warming

    NYT “Scientists Challenging Climate Science…”
    http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/01/30/scientists-challenging-climate-science-appear-to-flunk-climate-economics/?scp=1&sq=andrew%20revkin&st=Search

    WSJ “Check With Climate Scientists…”
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204740904577193270727472662.html?mod=wsj_share_tweet

  2. Curt Thomson

    The climategate emails—and there are plenty by, to, or about these 39 scientists, detail how difficult it is to publish anything they disagree with, thanks to intimidation and manipulation of editors, blackballing of those who disagree with them, and other blood sports.

    But… the 39 certainly don’t lack curiosity. In fact, they have a highly advanced sense of curiosity.

  3. Al

    Is there any such thing as a ‘Lunar Almanac’? Or what would it be called so I could search for it?

    That is:
    If I were standing on a spot on the moon, is there any easy reference for the solar ‘rise, set, and path’ sorts of information? I’m wondering just how difficult ‘solar tracking’ would be, and how easy is it to make ‘perpetual shadow’.

  4. Fletcher Christian

    Nitpicking, I know, but the commenter on that thread saying that CO2 doesn’t change phase at earthly temperatures is wrong. The lowest recorded temperature on Earth is 60 degrees C below the sublimation point of CO2, and temperatures in some areas (parts of Siberia for example) get below that point with fair frequency.

  5. Andrew W

    60 degrees? Nitpicking your nitpicking:
    Wiki: The lowest temperature ever recorded at the surface of the Earth was −89.2 °C (−128.6 °F; 184.0 K) at the Soviet Vostok Station in Antarctica July 21, 1983.

    At 1 atmosphere (near mean sea level pressure), the gas deposits directly to a solid at temperatures below −78 °C (−108 °F; 195 K) and the solid sublimes directly to a gas above −78 °C.

    Vostok is at altitude, and pressure might be low enough to stop formation of dry ice.

    1. Al

      Please don’t let this discussion arrive at the point where we have to use ‘fugacity’ in a sentence correctly. Pretty please.

      And, actually, I have some one atm CO2 in a bottle in my garage, and I’m still stuck here on Earth. ;)

  6. Curt Thomson

    Related – The Incredible Shrinking Carbon Pollution Forecast

    Back in 2005 … EIA projected a 37% increase in CO2 emissions between 2005 and 2025. This year EIA is projecting that emissions in 2025 will be 6% below what they were in 2005. Looking out to the end of the current forecast horizon in 2035 emissions are still projected to be 3% below 2005 levels.

    Mead weighs in here. (He messes up by stating EIA’s numbers are global)

    And no, draconian CAFE standards and the for-our-children Mercury and Air Toxics Standards act are NOT factored in. It’s mostly about GDP projections. And the ’08 recession is only a small part of it.

    Also not factored in is the increasing use of natural gas instead of coal. On that note, here’s the latest from that squeaky-clean group The Sierra Club:

    Sierra Club took $26M from gas industry to fight coal-fired plants

    That was pre-fracking. Now Chesapeake Energy’s money is being used to… fight natural gas development.

    There is probably a Wag The Dog movie in all this, if anyone was interested in producing it.

    1. DaveP.

      Is it too much to hope for that the hack responsible for making the decision to hand $26,000,000 in company funds to an organization that hates the entire industry and wants to destroy it…was handed his desk contents in a cardboard box with a printout of the Webster’s Dictionary entry on “Blacklist” stapled to it?

  7. Larry J

    What happens when you rub two climatologists together? Good question. I wonder is you rub them together fast enough, hard enough and with enough force, could you set them on fire? Sounds like a great science experiment! Unlike the “climate scientists”, we’d want good controls and to demonstrate repeatable results so this experiment could be repeated many times.

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