Category Archives: Social Commentary

Just When You Thought It Couldn’t Get Worse

Professor Minehaha is just the gift that keeps on giving. Now it turns out that he’s not just a fake Indian–his “native American artwork” is plagiarized, and in violation of copyright.

Placing Churchill’s work beside that of renowned artist Thomas E. Mails and the two look like mirror images. But one is a copyrighted drawing. The other is an autographed print by Churchill…

…Compare it side-by-side to the serigraph by Churchill, created some 20 years later: the composition, the images, the placement are nearly identical.

Intellectual property attorney Jim Hubbell said it’s clearly no accident.

“It’s very obvious that the Churchill piece was taken directly from the Mails piece,” Hubbell said. “There’s just too many similarities between the two for it to have been coincidence.”

This guy surely is a piece of work. I’d love to seem him stay on as a poster child for everything that’s wrong with academia and the tenure system, but it’s hard to see how the University of Colorado can keep him on.

[Update a few minutes later]

Michelle Malkin has more, with pictures.

Just When You Thought It Couldn’t Get Worse

Professor Minehaha is just the gift that keeps on giving. Now it turns out that he’s not just a fake Indian–his “native American artwork” is plagiarized, and in violation of copyright.

Placing Churchill’s work beside that of renowned artist Thomas E. Mails and the two look like mirror images. But one is a copyrighted drawing. The other is an autographed print by Churchill…

…Compare it side-by-side to the serigraph by Churchill, created some 20 years later: the composition, the images, the placement are nearly identical.

Intellectual property attorney Jim Hubbell said it’s clearly no accident.

“It’s very obvious that the Churchill piece was taken directly from the Mails piece,” Hubbell said. “There’s just too many similarities between the two for it to have been coincidence.”

This guy surely is a piece of work. I’d love to seem him stay on as a poster child for everything that’s wrong with academia and the tenure system, but it’s hard to see how the University of Colorado can keep him on.

[Update a few minutes later]

Michelle Malkin has more, with pictures.

Just When You Thought It Couldn’t Get Worse

Professor Minehaha is just the gift that keeps on giving. Now it turns out that he’s not just a fake Indian–his “native American artwork” is plagiarized, and in violation of copyright.

Placing Churchill’s work beside that of renowned artist Thomas E. Mails and the two look like mirror images. But one is a copyrighted drawing. The other is an autographed print by Churchill…

…Compare it side-by-side to the serigraph by Churchill, created some 20 years later: the composition, the images, the placement are nearly identical.

Intellectual property attorney Jim Hubbell said it’s clearly no accident.

“It’s very obvious that the Churchill piece was taken directly from the Mails piece,” Hubbell said. “There’s just too many similarities between the two for it to have been coincidence.”

This guy surely is a piece of work. I’d love to seem him stay on as a poster child for everything that’s wrong with academia and the tenure system, but it’s hard to see how the University of Colorado can keep him on.

[Update a few minutes later]

Michelle Malkin has more, with pictures.

How Is It?

…that the people we’re told are our greatest intellectuals seem so incapable of basic critical thinking, or English comprehension?

Several Harvard professors said they were more furious after reading the precise remarks, saying they felt he believed women were intellectually inferior to men.

Everett I. Mendelsohn, a professor of the history of science, said that once he read the transcript, he understood why Dr. Summers “might have wanted to keep it a secret.”

I’m very glad that I don’t have to be in college today.

Lousy Salesmen

A company threw away thirty-five thousand pairs of shoes, because they were like bi-pedal whoopie cushions:

Customers complained that with every step, their shoes made the sound of someone passing gas.

The problem wasn’t the shoes–the problem was that they accidentally sold them to the wrong customers, who weren’t in the market for that particular feature.

If the numbers here are right, the shoes cost them about six to eight bucks a pair. I simply cannot believe that they wouldn’t have quickly emptied the shelves of them for much more than that had they made a minimal attempt to market them, as gag gifts, or a way to keep track of toddlers, or just for kids (of all ages) to annoy adults. Even without bothering to rebrand, or come up with a clever name (feel free to offer suggestions in comments), they could have gotten their money back with profit just by tossing them up on Ebay as is.

Heck, they might have even ended up with a whole new product line. They could have been partnering with the supplier who screwed up, instead of paying lawyers. It could go down in the history of accidental techological innovation, kind of like vulcanizing rubber.

We Ain’t Got No Rhythm

In North America, that is:

Hannon and Sandra Trehub of the University of Toronto began their study with knowledge that other studies had shown people in North America struggle to grasp irregular rhythms. Balkan music proves troubling, for example. So the researchers studied 50 college students, mostly from the United States and Canada, and 17 first- or second-generation Bulgarian and Macedonian immigrants. Songs with simple meters were made more complex, and complex songs were simplified.

The North Americans recognized when things got trickier, but couldn’t tell when things got simpler. The immigrants figured both out.

I have an old album by the Irish folk musician Andy Irvine, who spent a lot of time in the Balkans, and plays bouzouki, on which he plays a number of horas. I can’t imagine how in the world folks dance to them.

But I was particularly appalled a few years ago when in an elevator, I heard a version of Dave Brubeck’s “Take Five” done in 4/4 time (it was originally written, as hinted at by the title, in 5/4–another Brubeck classic, on the same album, is Blue Rondo A La Turk, in 9/8). They had apparently dumbed it down for less sophisticated American ears. I almost couldn’t believe what I was hearing.

We Ain’t Got No Rhythm

In North America, that is:

Hannon and Sandra Trehub of the University of Toronto began their study with knowledge that other studies had shown people in North America struggle to grasp irregular rhythms. Balkan music proves troubling, for example. So the researchers studied 50 college students, mostly from the United States and Canada, and 17 first- or second-generation Bulgarian and Macedonian immigrants. Songs with simple meters were made more complex, and complex songs were simplified.

The North Americans recognized when things got trickier, but couldn’t tell when things got simpler. The immigrants figured both out.

I have an old album by the Irish folk musician Andy Irvine, who spent a lot of time in the Balkans, and plays bouzouki, on which he plays a number of horas. I can’t imagine how in the world folks dance to them.

But I was particularly appalled a few years ago when in an elevator, I heard a version of Dave Brubeck’s “Take Five” done in 4/4 time (it was originally written, as hinted at by the title, in 5/4–another Brubeck classic, on the same album, is Blue Rondo A La Turk, in 9/8). They had apparently dumbed it down for less sophisticated American ears. I almost couldn’t believe what I was hearing.

We Ain’t Got No Rhythm

In North America, that is:

Hannon and Sandra Trehub of the University of Toronto began their study with knowledge that other studies had shown people in North America struggle to grasp irregular rhythms. Balkan music proves troubling, for example. So the researchers studied 50 college students, mostly from the United States and Canada, and 17 first- or second-generation Bulgarian and Macedonian immigrants. Songs with simple meters were made more complex, and complex songs were simplified.

The North Americans recognized when things got trickier, but couldn’t tell when things got simpler. The immigrants figured both out.

I have an old album by the Irish folk musician Andy Irvine, who spent a lot of time in the Balkans, and plays bouzouki, on which he plays a number of horas. I can’t imagine how in the world folks dance to them.

But I was particularly appalled a few years ago when in an elevator, I heard a version of Dave Brubeck’s “Take Five” done in 4/4 time (it was originally written, as hinted at by the title, in 5/4–another Brubeck classic, on the same album, is Blue Rondo A La Turk, in 9/8). They had apparently dumbed it down for less sophisticated American ears. I almost couldn’t believe what I was hearing.

Setting Him Up For The Fall

Sounds like Professor Minehaha is going to get his walking papers–for academic fraud.

It’s too bad. I’d actually like to see him keep his job, and continue to embarrass the University of Colorado. As someone said on Brit Hume’s panel last night, he’s a poster child for everything that’s wrong with academia.

Then again, he may survive. After all, an endorsement like this is hard to beat:

“I’ve read a fair amount of his work, and a lot of it is excellent, penetrating and of high scholarly quality,” said Noam Chomsky, linguistics professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an anti-war activist.