Category Archives: Political Commentary

Hyperbole

Last night I heard some Democrat flack claim that the current economy is the worst since Herbert Hoover.

Are people so historically ignorant that this kind of stuff is effective? For me, it’s totally counterproductive, and just makes me want to see Kerry, and all Dems lose all the more.

Well, He Can Write Off Michigan

Senator Kerry steps in it again:

“I just came here from Bowling Green,” Kerry told the crowd to subdued applause. “I was smart enough not to pick a choice between the Falcons and the, well, you know, all those other teams out there. I just go for Buckeye football, that’s where I’m coming from.”

At that point, before all the boos began raining down upon him, Kerry seemed to realize his error. In an attempt to silent the angry crowd of University of Michigan supporters, Kerry said, “But that was while I was in Ohio. I know I’m in the state of Michigan and you got a great big M and a powerhouse of a team.” Then his face, presumably, the Botox permitting, turned Big Blue.

If it’s Monday, it must be wolverine country.

Dead Hamster Bounce

Gallup says that the convention cost Kerry support:

In the survey, taken Friday and Saturday, the Democratic ticket of Kerry and John Edwards trailed the Republican ticket of Bush and Dick Cheney 50% to 46% among likely voters, with independent candidate Ralph Nader at 2%.

Before the convention, the two were essentially tied, with Kerry at 47%, Bush at 46%.

The change in support was within the poll’s margin of error of +/- 4 percentage points in the sample of 763 likely voters. But it was nonetheless a stunning result, the first time in the Gallup Poll since the 1972 Democratic convention that a candidate seemed to lose ground at his convention.

That may be because there are some other similarities with the 1972 Democratic convention.

The really bad news is that this was a partial weekend poll, which usually tend to favor Democrats (they seem to be home more for surveying on the weekends than Republicans).

Speaking of hamsters, there’s some pretty phunny photoshopping here. I can’t decide which I like better: “Saving Private Hamster” or the operating room scene with the bunny suit.

“The Senator Needs You To Move”

Mark Steyn has Senator Kerry pegged:

Kerry now says that Bush “misled” him on Iraq. But, if he was that easily suckered by a renowned moron, how much more susceptible would he be to such wily operators as Chirac. They would speak French to each other, and Jacques would blow soothingly in his ear, and Kerry would look flattered, and there’d be lots of resolutions and joint declarations, and nothing would happen. We’d be fighting the war on terror through the self-admiring inertia of windbag multilateralism.

As for the home front, Kerry says: “As President, I will not evade or equivocate; I will immediately implement the recommendations of that [the 9/11] commission.” Whoa, hold on there. There’s a ton of recommendations, and some of us don’t like the part about concentrating all US intelligence under one cabinet secretary who serves not at the President’s pleasure but for a fixed term. That effectively institutionalises the groupthink resistance to alternative ideas that led to the 9/11 failures. Leadership is about hearing different viewpoints and reaching a judgment. But Kerry gives the impression that, as long as he enjoys the perks of the top job, he’s happy to subcontract his judgment to others.

He moans endlessly about the “outsourcing” of American jobs but, when it comes to his own job, he’s willing to outsource American foreign policy to the mushy transnational talk-shops and to outsource homeland security to some dubious intelligence tsar. There’s no sense of any strategic vision, no sense that he’s thought about Iran or North Korea or any of the other powder kegs about to blow. I tried to ask him about some of these matters during the New Hampshire primary and he intoned in response, “Sometimes truly courageous leadership means having the courage not to show any leadership.” (I quote from memory.)

The whole thing is like that. You know what to do.

Of course, he finished with a flourish:

…After an eternity, an aide stepped out from behind him and said, “The Senator needs you to move.”

“Well, why couldn’t he have said that?” muttered one of the old coots, as Kerry swept past us.

That’s how I felt after the Convention: all week Senators Biden, Lieberman and Edwards made the case that the Democrats were credible on national security. Why couldn’t Kerry have said that?

Because in the end he’s running for President because he feels he ought to be President. That’s his message to George W Bush: “The Senator needs you to move.” And even then everyone else says it better.

“The Senator Needs You To Move”

Mark Steyn has Senator Kerry pegged:

Kerry now says that Bush “misled” him on Iraq. But, if he was that easily suckered by a renowned moron, how much more susceptible would he be to such wily operators as Chirac. They would speak French to each other, and Jacques would blow soothingly in his ear, and Kerry would look flattered, and there’d be lots of resolutions and joint declarations, and nothing would happen. We’d be fighting the war on terror through the self-admiring inertia of windbag multilateralism.

As for the home front, Kerry says: “As President, I will not evade or equivocate; I will immediately implement the recommendations of that [the 9/11] commission.” Whoa, hold on there. There’s a ton of recommendations, and some of us don’t like the part about concentrating all US intelligence under one cabinet secretary who serves not at the President’s pleasure but for a fixed term. That effectively institutionalises the groupthink resistance to alternative ideas that led to the 9/11 failures. Leadership is about hearing different viewpoints and reaching a judgment. But Kerry gives the impression that, as long as he enjoys the perks of the top job, he’s happy to subcontract his judgment to others.

He moans endlessly about the “outsourcing” of American jobs but, when it comes to his own job, he’s willing to outsource American foreign policy to the mushy transnational talk-shops and to outsource homeland security to some dubious intelligence tsar. There’s no sense of any strategic vision, no sense that he’s thought about Iran or North Korea or any of the other powder kegs about to blow. I tried to ask him about some of these matters during the New Hampshire primary and he intoned in response, “Sometimes truly courageous leadership means having the courage not to show any leadership.” (I quote from memory.)

The whole thing is like that. You know what to do.

Of course, he finished with a flourish:

…After an eternity, an aide stepped out from behind him and said, “The Senator needs you to move.”

“Well, why couldn’t he have said that?” muttered one of the old coots, as Kerry swept past us.

That’s how I felt after the Convention: all week Senators Biden, Lieberman and Edwards made the case that the Democrats were credible on national security. Why couldn’t Kerry have said that?

Because in the end he’s running for President because he feels he ought to be President. That’s his message to George W Bush: “The Senator needs you to move.” And even then everyone else says it better.

“The Senator Needs You To Move”

Mark Steyn has Senator Kerry pegged:

Kerry now says that Bush “misled” him on Iraq. But, if he was that easily suckered by a renowned moron, how much more susceptible would he be to such wily operators as Chirac. They would speak French to each other, and Jacques would blow soothingly in his ear, and Kerry would look flattered, and there’d be lots of resolutions and joint declarations, and nothing would happen. We’d be fighting the war on terror through the self-admiring inertia of windbag multilateralism.

As for the home front, Kerry says: “As President, I will not evade or equivocate; I will immediately implement the recommendations of that [the 9/11] commission.” Whoa, hold on there. There’s a ton of recommendations, and some of us don’t like the part about concentrating all US intelligence under one cabinet secretary who serves not at the President’s pleasure but for a fixed term. That effectively institutionalises the groupthink resistance to alternative ideas that led to the 9/11 failures. Leadership is about hearing different viewpoints and reaching a judgment. But Kerry gives the impression that, as long as he enjoys the perks of the top job, he’s happy to subcontract his judgment to others.

He moans endlessly about the “outsourcing” of American jobs but, when it comes to his own job, he’s willing to outsource American foreign policy to the mushy transnational talk-shops and to outsource homeland security to some dubious intelligence tsar. There’s no sense of any strategic vision, no sense that he’s thought about Iran or North Korea or any of the other powder kegs about to blow. I tried to ask him about some of these matters during the New Hampshire primary and he intoned in response, “Sometimes truly courageous leadership means having the courage not to show any leadership.” (I quote from memory.)

The whole thing is like that. You know what to do.

Of course, he finished with a flourish:

…After an eternity, an aide stepped out from behind him and said, “The Senator needs you to move.”

“Well, why couldn’t he have said that?” muttered one of the old coots, as Kerry swept past us.

That’s how I felt after the Convention: all week Senators Biden, Lieberman and Edwards made the case that the Democrats were credible on national security. Why couldn’t Kerry have said that?

Because in the end he’s running for President because he feels he ought to be President. That’s his message to George W Bush: “The Senator needs you to move.” And even then everyone else says it better.