Category Archives: Media Criticism

Find The Missing Word

Here’s a story about thousands of youths starting to attack protestors and others in Paris.

Pumped up by news coverage, these youths boast of trying to steal mobile phones and money and vow to take revenge for the daily humiliation they say they endure from the police…

…The police and independent analysts say that most of the vandalism and violence that has marred the protests has been by young men, largely immigrants or the children of immigrants, from tough, underprivileged suburbs, who roam in groups and have little else to keep them busy.

Funny, nowhere in the article can one determine the country from which these “youths” immigrated, or what their religious background might be. One might almost think it irrelevant to the story. But I suspect that it’s not…

And what kind of moral midgetry is at work here?

In live coverage of the mass protests in Paris, CNN compared the protests to the 1989 Tiananmen Square uprising in Beijing. What worries the authorities now is that the targets of anger are shifting, moving beyond attacks on property to attacks on people as well.

Let’s see, in one case we have throngs of peaceful protests of people seeking liberty, brutally put down by an army with tanks. In the other, we have rampaging young men, nihilistically smashing, stealing and burning property, and brutally attacking its owners, seeking nothing but gratification and destruction. That’s how I’d compare them, anyway. But then, I’m not CNN.

Pot And Kettle

Amidst exposing other media myths about Iraq, Victor Davis Hanson points out the irony of a press corps that repeatedly accuses the Bush administration of incompetence:

Weigh that success [in Iraq] against the behavior of the media that sees mostly American incompetence. At CBS, Dan Rather insisted to us that a clearly forged memo, but one that fit his own ideological agenda, was authentic. Michael Isikoff relied on one anonymous

“Mixed Messages”

Tim Graham has probably found the words that turned John Green’s stomach:

My concerns about the senator is that, in the course of this campaign, I’ve been listening very carefully to what he says, and he changes positions on the war in Iraq. He changes positions on something as fundamental as what you believe in your core, in your heart of hearts, is right in Iraq. You cannot lead if you send mixed messages. Mixed messages send the wrong signals to our troops. Mixed messages send the wrong signals to our allies. Mixed messages send the wrong signals to the Iraqi citizens.

I guess the truth hurts. Or at least makes you queasy, if you’re part of the liberal elite.

And speaking of the liberal elite, Victor Davis Hanson is appropriately hard on them, and Michael Ware in particular:

HH: So with this in mind…again, I stress he’s the Baghdad bureau chief of Time Magazine, at one time the most influential magazine in the West, I believe. What is the disease in the media? Where did it come from?

VDH: I think it came to be frank between the journalism schools, the academic training of a lot of the people, and this affluent, elite culture, to be frank, that comes out of the unversities on the left and right coasts, that’s divorced from the tragic view, because these people are not…they don’t open hardware stores. They don’t service cars. They’ve never worked physically with their hands. They have an idea in this international culture of the West that somehow, all of their affluence, all of their travel, all of their freedom came out of a head of Zeus, and it’s not dependent on the U.S. military, the United States role in the world. They have no appreciation for the very system that birthed and maintained them. And they’ve had this sort of sick cynicism, nihilism, skepticism, and the height of their affluence and leisure, that they don’t have any gratitude at all, which is really one of the most important human attributes. Humility to say you know, I’m very lucky to be a Westerner, and have certain freedoms. And that’s why he cannot appreciate what we’re trying to do in Iraq, because he has no appreciation of the very idea that he can jet out of Baghdad anytime he wants on a Western jet that’s going to get him safely to a Western country, where he’s going to be protected, that the people in Iraq want that same thing that he doesn’t seem to appreciate.

“Mixed Messages”

Tim Graham has probably found the words that turned John Green’s stomach:

My concerns about the senator is that, in the course of this campaign, I’ve been listening very carefully to what he says, and he changes positions on the war in Iraq. He changes positions on something as fundamental as what you believe in your core, in your heart of hearts, is right in Iraq. You cannot lead if you send mixed messages. Mixed messages send the wrong signals to our troops. Mixed messages send the wrong signals to our allies. Mixed messages send the wrong signals to the Iraqi citizens.

I guess the truth hurts. Or at least makes you queasy, if you’re part of the liberal elite.

And speaking of the liberal elite, Victor Davis Hanson is appropriately hard on them, and Michael Ware in particular:

HH: So with this in mind…again, I stress he’s the Baghdad bureau chief of Time Magazine, at one time the most influential magazine in the West, I believe. What is the disease in the media? Where did it come from?

VDH: I think it came to be frank between the journalism schools, the academic training of a lot of the people, and this affluent, elite culture, to be frank, that comes out of the unversities on the left and right coasts, that’s divorced from the tragic view, because these people are not…they don’t open hardware stores. They don’t service cars. They’ve never worked physically with their hands. They have an idea in this international culture of the West that somehow, all of their affluence, all of their travel, all of their freedom came out of a head of Zeus, and it’s not dependent on the U.S. military, the United States role in the world. They have no appreciation for the very system that birthed and maintained them. And they’ve had this sort of sick cynicism, nihilism, skepticism, and the height of their affluence and leisure, that they don’t have any gratitude at all, which is really one of the most important human attributes. Humility to say you know, I’m very lucky to be a Westerner, and have certain freedoms. And that’s why he cannot appreciate what we’re trying to do in Iraq, because he has no appreciation of the very idea that he can jet out of Baghdad anytime he wants on a Western jet that’s going to get him safely to a Western country, where he’s going to be protected, that the people in Iraq want that same thing that he doesn’t seem to appreciate.

“Mixed Messages”

Tim Graham has probably found the words that turned John Green’s stomach:

My concerns about the senator is that, in the course of this campaign, I’ve been listening very carefully to what he says, and he changes positions on the war in Iraq. He changes positions on something as fundamental as what you believe in your core, in your heart of hearts, is right in Iraq. You cannot lead if you send mixed messages. Mixed messages send the wrong signals to our troops. Mixed messages send the wrong signals to our allies. Mixed messages send the wrong signals to the Iraqi citizens.

I guess the truth hurts. Or at least makes you queasy, if you’re part of the liberal elite.

And speaking of the liberal elite, Victor Davis Hanson is appropriately hard on them, and Michael Ware in particular:

HH: So with this in mind…again, I stress he’s the Baghdad bureau chief of Time Magazine, at one time the most influential magazine in the West, I believe. What is the disease in the media? Where did it come from?

VDH: I think it came to be frank between the journalism schools, the academic training of a lot of the people, and this affluent, elite culture, to be frank, that comes out of the unversities on the left and right coasts, that’s divorced from the tragic view, because these people are not…they don’t open hardware stores. They don’t service cars. They’ve never worked physically with their hands. They have an idea in this international culture of the West that somehow, all of their affluence, all of their travel, all of their freedom came out of a head of Zeus, and it’s not dependent on the U.S. military, the United States role in the world. They have no appreciation for the very system that birthed and maintained them. And they’ve had this sort of sick cynicism, nihilism, skepticism, and the height of their affluence and leisure, that they don’t have any gratitude at all, which is really one of the most important human attributes. Humility to say you know, I’m very lucky to be a Westerner, and have certain freedoms. And that’s why he cannot appreciate what we’re trying to do in Iraq, because he has no appreciation of the very idea that he can jet out of Baghdad anytime he wants on a Western jet that’s going to get him safely to a Western country, where he’s going to be protected, that the people in Iraq want that same thing that he doesn’t seem to appreciate.

Double Standard?

Need you ask?

I guess not all Gold Star mothers have (in Maureen Dowd’s memorable words) “absolute moral authority.” Apparently only the nutcases like Cindy Sheehan do, perhaps because they tell the press what they want to hear:

Julia Conover lost her son, Marine Lance Cpl. Brandon Dewey, to a suicide bomber in Iraq exactly two months ago to the day Monday. She, too, attended the Modesto funeral of Lance Cpl. Long. She

The Other Civil War

How come the media isn’t 24/7 about this “civil war”?

Eyewitnesses said most of those wounded in Monday’s fighting in the Gaza Strip were policemen who tried to prevent Fatah gunmen from taking over government buildings and security installations. The two sides exchanged gunfire for several hours in scenes that many Palestinians said were reminiscent of the civil war in Lebanon in the 1970s.

Probably because they can’t figure out a way to pin it on America, and George Bush. They’re probably even having trouble fingering Israel for it, though that’s usually a piece of cake for them.