Category Archives: Media Criticism

Lunar Drilling

Good job by Jon Goff to recognize that Lunar outgassing events suggest viable gas deposits that may be able to be accessed to benefit exploration and settlement of the Moon. They also play into my Old West theme for the Moon. Before the outgassing was noticed, I commissioned some artists to draw a picture of an old-fashioned oil derrick on the Moon. Alas, the art is not ready. I did mention here that rock bursts on Earth that plague mines that drill deep indicate to me that the pressure of the rock on the Moon could also cause gas to be trapped there that could be tapped.

Also see David Powell’s article on Space.com entitled (by his anonymous editor hopefully) “Lunar Flash Mystery Solved: Moon Just Passing Gas”.

If lunar outgassing is a source of CO, CO2 or H2O, this could prove useful to future lunar colonies, supplying drinking water and fuel for example and saving billions of dollars in transportation costs.

I think the glib title created a laugh test for any future exploitation of the gas.

Rebuttal

Google is going to offer people an opportunity to point out journalistic errors, right alongside the stories:

We’ll be trying out a mechanism for publishing comments from a special subset of readers: those people or organizations who were actual participants in the story in question. Our long-term vision is that any participant will be able to send in their comments, and we’ll show them next to the articles about the story. Comments will be published in full, without any edits, but marked as “comments” so readers know it’s the individual’s perspective, rather than part of a journalist’s report.

As always, Google News will direct readers to the professionally-written articles and news sources our algorithms have determined are relevant for a topic. From bloggers to mainstream journalists, the journalists who help create the news we read every day occupy a critical place in the information age. But we’re hoping that by adding this feature, we can help enhance the news experience for readers, testing the hypothesis that — whether they’re penguin researchers or presidential candidates– a personal view can sometimes add a whole new dimension to the story.

Not to mention a whole new perspective. And often a dose of reality.

As Glenn writes, this is bad news for many so-called journalists, and good news for the rest of us.

I Can’t Think Of Any

Somehow this kind of thing only seems to go one direction.

By way of comparison, who are the conservative reporters who are torpedoing their own careers by fabricating stories about Clinton or Reid or Pelosi? I can’t really think of any. The only conservative reporter who comes to mind is an extremely minor one by the name of Jeff Gannon whose “offense” was to ask a softball question of Bush during a press conference. If liberal reporters were similarly slimed for asking questions of an opposite nature (i.e., questions designed to make Bush look bad), we would not have a White House Press corps.

Career-ending journalistic insanity — mostly attributable to the war in Iraq — appears to be almost exclusively a phenomenon of the left. If you know of some prominent counterexamples, though, please set me straight.

Of course, just statistically, there are probably a lot more liberal reporters than conservative ones, so that might be a partial explanation. But I’m sure it’s not the whole one…

[Update in mid-afternoon]

Instapundit has a roundup of Beauchamp-related links, including this one by Don Surber, who wonders why there’s such a sellers’ market for lies on the left.

I Can’t Think Of Any

Somehow this kind of thing only seems to go one direction.

By way of comparison, who are the conservative reporters who are torpedoing their own careers by fabricating stories about Clinton or Reid or Pelosi? I can’t really think of any. The only conservative reporter who comes to mind is an extremely minor one by the name of Jeff Gannon whose “offense” was to ask a softball question of Bush during a press conference. If liberal reporters were similarly slimed for asking questions of an opposite nature (i.e., questions designed to make Bush look bad), we would not have a White House Press corps.

Career-ending journalistic insanity — mostly attributable to the war in Iraq — appears to be almost exclusively a phenomenon of the left. If you know of some prominent counterexamples, though, please set me straight.

Of course, just statistically, there are probably a lot more liberal reporters than conservative ones, so that might be a partial explanation. But I’m sure it’s not the whole one…

[Update in mid-afternoon]

Instapundit has a roundup of Beauchamp-related links, including this one by Don Surber, who wonders why there’s such a sellers’ market for lies on the left.

I Can’t Think Of Any

Somehow this kind of thing only seems to go one direction.

By way of comparison, who are the conservative reporters who are torpedoing their own careers by fabricating stories about Clinton or Reid or Pelosi? I can’t really think of any. The only conservative reporter who comes to mind is an extremely minor one by the name of Jeff Gannon whose “offense” was to ask a softball question of Bush during a press conference. If liberal reporters were similarly slimed for asking questions of an opposite nature (i.e., questions designed to make Bush look bad), we would not have a White House Press corps.

Career-ending journalistic insanity — mostly attributable to the war in Iraq — appears to be almost exclusively a phenomenon of the left. If you know of some prominent counterexamples, though, please set me straight.

Of course, just statistically, there are probably a lot more liberal reporters than conservative ones, so that might be a partial explanation. But I’m sure it’s not the whole one…

[Update in mid-afternoon]

Instapundit has a roundup of Beauchamp-related links, including this one by Don Surber, who wonders why there’s such a sellers’ market for lies on the left.

McCarthyism On The Left

Like this is news:

Novak blamed liberal discrimination which he said forces young conservatives to remain “in the closet” if they hope to have a career in media.

“One of the big differences in 50 years is that the liberals have now filtered into the executive ranks of journalism. And so if you go into journalism now not in the closet but out in the open as a conservative, you’re going to have a hard time getting a job, believe me.”

Conservatives also don’t like journalism as a profession, Novak added, saying that when he goes to various colleges and universities, the young conservatives and libertarians he runs into rarely have any interest in journalism.

The syndicated columnist fit these trends into what he said was a general decline in the journalism business, despite the fact that it has become more professionalized:

“Journalism is a hard thing to gauge. When I set out with my first paper in the summer of 1948, for the Joliet Herald-News there were in the newsroom there about two or three people who had ever been to college. Journalism was not an educated person’s game. So we’re much better educated, we’re sophisticated, we have people with graduate degrees